Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I am new to Sony and just got my new(to me) a7r ii. I have a couple questions. I bought this body primarily for my landscape work but it will be used for a lot. So, is IBIS always on? Do I need to disable it when shooting on a tripod?

What is the button on the side of my 16-35 f/2.8? Is it focus hold? If I'm using back button focus it seems I don't need to worry about that.

 

Are there any good guides people have come across to get me up to speed on the new system. I am coming from Fuji and Canon so very different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's best to disable ibis when on a tripod. Some sony lenses are stabilized, in that case you need to disable it on the lens itself.  The side button on your lens is for focus hold, but can also be programmed to do other things. On my a7riii I have programmed it (on my fe90 and on my fe70-300) to do eye focus. Some useful stuff on the a7 series is to be found on www. markgaler.com

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Lescatalpas said:

It's best to disable ibis when on a tripod. Some sony lenses are stabilized, in that case you need to disable it on the lens itself.

 

 

Where do you have this from? I think it is not necessary to disable SteadyShot on a tripod. Current stabilization systems are very accurate and should be able to handle a tripod.

[edit] Just found a remark in the Sony helpguide that says it should be switched off... intersting. Is there a test that backs this claim?

Edited by keepcoding

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, keepcoding said:

Where do you have this from? I think it is not necessary to disable SteadyShot on a tripod. Current stabilization systems are very accurate and should be able to handle a tripod.

[edit] Just found a remark in the Sony helpguide that says it should be switched off... intersting. Is there a test that backs this claim?

You can test it yourself. You will find sharper results on tripod when ibis is off, especially with longer exposures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Lescatalpas said:

You can test it yourself. You will find sharper results on tripod when ibis is off, especially with longer exposures.

I did just that with my 100-400 when I got my a7iii and no question it performed better with stabilization off on tripod.  I believe the rigidity of the support causes the IBIS to "fight" itself resulting in minute camera shake/movement.  It is nice that the on off switch is on the lens itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/11/2018 at 5:00 AM, Lescatalpas said:

. On my a7riii I have programmed it (on my fe90 and on my fe70-300) to do eye focus. Some useful stuff on the a7 series is to be found on www. markgaler.com

 

 

It would be nice if one could program the focus hold button for different functions on different lenses.   Some lenses focus hold is helpful, but I too like Eye AF on most of my lenses with the button so my  cameras are programmed in that fashion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Lescatalpas said:

You can test it yourself. You will find sharper results on tripod when ibis is off, especially with longer exposures.

I just did a quick test: 200mm @ 1 second exposure, took several shots with and without SteadyShot. There is absolutely no difference on my A7III.

 

Edited by keepcoding

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, tinplater said:

I did just that with my 100-400 when I got my a7iii and no question it performed better with stabilization off on tripod.  I believe the rigidity of the support causes the IBIS to "fight" itself resulting in minute camera shake/movement.  It is nice that the on off switch is on the lens itself.

The 100-400mm has OSS, maybe that's the reason why it doesn't perform so well in your tests on the tripod.

Edited by keepcoding

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, keepcoding said:

I just did a quick test: 200mm @ 1 second exposure, took several shots with and without SteadyShot. There is absolutely no difference on my A7III.

 

Hysteresis.

That you did not observe it does not mean it does not exist. It is also entirely possible that the IBIS in the A7III is able to detect when the camera is on a Tripod and reduce the sensitively of the IBIS algorithms. 

The only way to be certain is to turn IBIS off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, keepcoding said:

I just did a quick test: 200mm @ 1 second exposure, took several shots with and without SteadyShot. There is absolutely no difference on my A7III.

 

 just watch this. But if you are convinced you can leave ibis on, that's fine too.  Or redo your test at 25 secs.

Edited by Lescatalpas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Lescatalpas said:

just watch this. But if you are convinced you can leave ibis on, that's fine too.  Or redo your test at 25 secs.

Again, the guy in the video is looking at in-lens stabilization of old (!) lenses. No doubt those will cause issues on a tripod.
What I suggested is that modern IBIS systems should be able to handle a steady base.

I did another test, this time 20 seconds at 200mm, with and without SteadyShot. And again I don't see any difference (see 100% crops below). I'm confident that I can leave SteadyShot on at all times.

steadyshot_on_vs_off.jpg

Edited by keepcoding

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, keepcoding said:

Again, the guy in the video is looking at in-lens stabilization of old (!) lenses. No doubt those will cause issues on a tripod.
What I suggested is that modern IBIS systems should be able to handle a steady base.

I did another test, this time 20 seconds at 200mm, with and without SteadyShot. And again I don't see any difference (see 100% crops below). I'm confident that I can leave SteadyShot on at all times.

steadyshot_on_vs_off.jpg

I understand what you're saying. The times that I have accidentally left it on have not done anything noticeable. BUT, it takes me about 2 seconds to turn it off so why not just to be safe? Unless it's really windy or something and there could be tripod movement. Like I said, not worth arguing over since it takes such little time and effort to turn it off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×