Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
bbphoto

Vertical banding with A7RIII during strobe use

Recommended Posts

Hey guys, 

I'm not a studio expert, and am struggling to figure out what is causing vertical stripes/banding on my paper backdrops when using strobes. Color or white, doesn't matter. I'm using the flashpoint/godox ad600 strobe with HSS turned on and shooting (in my attached example) at 1/1250th and ISO 100. This has happened to me numerous times now, and I haven't been able to detect a pattern yet. I haven't tried turning off Electronic Front Curtain yet, but will next time. It's only noticeable on paper backdrops (or maybe any plain surface), but not on my subjects. 

 

Any ideas? 

 

Thanks!

post-4318-0-01383800-1520826997_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two thoughts:

1) Flicker from the HSS strobe. Try normal sync speed.

2) Compression artefacts from your raw converter or in-camera jpeg engine. Try uncompressed raw in CaptureOne.

 

Thanks Jaf, appreciate it! I'll try normal sync first. Hopefully it's not artefacts...would definitely mess my workflow up a bit (using LR on compressed RAWs) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jaf, appreciate it! I'll try normal sync first. Hopefully it's not artefacts...would definitely mess my workflow up a bit (using LR on compressed RAWs) 

 

I don't think that's the best workflow to go with anyway. You have to just bite the bullet and go uncompressed. I haven't used LR in years but why not try Capture One, I think there's a free version for Sony.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are reasons to use LR. Catalogueing, calibration, printing, presents and overall fast editing.

 

Other programs like C1, PS or DxO give better results on individual photos. But they're a bit of a pain if you have to turn out a large number of photos.

 

I still haven't been able to drop LR even if I loathe the direction it's taking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think that's the best workflow to go with anyway. You have to just bite the bullet and go uncompressed. I haven't used LR in years but why not try Capture One, I think there's a free version for Sony.

 

I just tried editing the same shot in C1 and unfortunately it's giving me the same results. It's not the raw engine, so it must be either the sensor itself or the strobe/way i'm using the strobe. Hmm.

 

 

There are reasons to use LR. Catalogueing, calibration, printing, presents and overall fast editing.

 

Other programs like C1, PS or DxO give better results on individual photos. But they're a bit of a pain if you have to turn out a large number of photos.

 

I still haven't been able to drop LR even if I loathe the direction it's taking.

 

I'm in the same boat! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, strobes emit pulses of light in HSS mode so that could be the issue. At standard sync it's just one flash so that may be the difference.

That very well may be true. Or the combination of HSS with ECFS. Found this flickr group chat regarding another Godox product with HSS and an A7 camera: https://www.flickr.com/groups/71917374@N00/discuss/72157642684407174/

 

I'll have to use it without HSS or without EFCS next time and hopefully won't have the issue. I guess for most studio scenarios, I wouldnt need HSS anyway...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disabling the electronic first curtain usually mitigates banding issues from the sensor readout/flicker but it may not remove it altogether in all situations. That said, I mostly shoot with shoot old school settings, like with film, and never have any issues related to the technical envelope of the cameras.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HSS is primarily for outdoor fill light where outdoor shutter speeds 

are typically faster than native synch speeds. In such applications 

the pulsed nature of HSS lighting is greatly masked over by the 

overwhelming amount of daylight [which acoarst is not pulsed] in 

the total lighting mix. 

   

In general, most user manuals I've read recommend mechanical

shutter settings for all modes of flash use. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disabling the electronic first curtain usually mitigates banding issues from the sensor readout/flicker but it may not remove it altogether in all situations. That said, I mostly shoot with shoot old school settings, like with film, and never have any issues related to the technical envelope of the cameras.

 

What exactly is the electronic first curtain shutter? Benefits of either on/off? The Sony explanation isn't too clear to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The mechanical shutter is still needed to reduce issues such as banding and rolling shutter effect from the sequential readout of the sensor. The second curtain, which ends exposure, is more important in this regard. Therefore you can disable the first curtain (by enabling electronic first curtain). This reduces shutter lag, noise, shutter shock and wear on the shutter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×