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Manual settings Sony ILCE-3000


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When you select aperture priority mode you choose the aperture, the camera chooses the appropriate shutter speed for correct exposure

When you select shutter speed, the camera chooses the correct aperture

When you select manual mode, you choose both the aperture and the shutter speed. 

 

I am not directly familiar with your camera, it may also allow you to choose "auto iso" where the camera selects the iso to achieve desired exposure as well.  However for most circumstances you choose an ISO and let the camera make its adjustments for exposure based upon the constant selected ISO.

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When you select aperture priority mode you choose the aperture, the camera chooses the appropriate shutter speed for correct exposure

When you select shutter speed, the camera chooses the correct aperture

When you select manual mode, you choose both the aperture and the shutter speed. 

 

I am not directly familiar with your camera, it may also allow you to choose "auto iso" where the camera selects the iso to achieve desired exposure as well.  However for most circumstances you choose an ISO and let the camera make its adjustments for exposure based upon the constant selected ISO.

Yes, this is what I mean tinplater,, I can not seem to find a way of adjusting both settings individually ? You can select the ISO ok but adjusting aperture then shutter speed apart from each other seems a bit of a task!

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.......  I can not seem to find a way of adjusting both settings individually ?

You can select the ISO ok but adjusting aperture then shutter speed apart

from each other seems a bit of a task!

  

To do that, select "Manual", aka "M-Mode". M-mode does not set 

the exposure for the user. You'll hafta learn use of the light meter.   

   

Perhaps the use of the meter is what you meant by saying that it 

"seems a bit of a task!" ? That "task" comes with the territory. You 

wanna set both exposure controls yourself ? How do you know to 

choose a combination that results in a useful exposure ? You use 

the meter as your guide. 

   

Or mebbe you're referring to the 3000's scarcity of dials ? It does 

have fewer control wheels than other models. That creates a less 

than convenient situation. The a3000 is a good quality, affordable 

camera, but more dials costs more money, if build quality is not to 

be compromised instead. 

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`

Almost no one, other than both of us, has an a3000. 

Your typical Sony fanboi has never even heard of it. 

  

What with the fewer dials, and especially considering 

that it cannot do back-button AF, I don't use any Sony 

lenses on it. Using old Nikkors the aperture control is

is by the ring on the lens where god himself intended 

it to be, so the camera's sole dial controls the shutter.   

     

My lenses are 50 yrs old and are great for MF. OTOH 

it's not my only camera, so the limitations are not any 

hardship. If I need a more high tech camera and lens 

I do have those on hand. The a3000 is a spare body. 

   

Due to its lack of features, the user manual is shorter 

than the typical lengthy tomes, so you really ought to 

get fully familiar with it. 

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Amazingly the Sony manual seems to skip how to use Manual Mode!!  It should be on page 44 by my determination, but not there in my perusal of the download.  So perhaps Username, who has the camera, could just give you the steps needed to control the shutter and the aperture in M mode?  Obviously the rotating dial controls either ap or shutter, the other function must be assigned to a button (I assume there is no aperture ring on the lens itself).

Here is the manual I downloaded.

 

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/548338/Sony-Ilce-3000.html

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That's P(rogram) mode. You can adjust either aperture or shutter and the other will follow according to the metered exposure.

Yes that's the scenairo jaf-photo,  You can not adjust or set each one separately ! one adjusts automatically with the other which just takes away that 100% way of manually setting  it ;) .

Anyway, Hay Ho it is what it is I guess :rolleyes:

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Amazingly the Sony manual seems to skip how to use Manual Mode!!  It should be on page 44 by my determination, but not there in my perusal of the download.  So perhaps Username, who has the camera, could just give you the steps needed to control the shutter and the aperture in M mode?  Obviously the rotating dial controls either ap or shutter, the other function must be assigned to a button (I assume there is no aperture ring on the lens itself).

Here is the manual I downloaded.

 

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/548338/Sony-Ilce-3000.html

Great link :D  :D

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`

Almost no one, other than both of us, has an a3000. 

Your typical Sony fanboi has never even heard of it. 

  

What with the fewer dials, and especially considering 

that it cannot do back-button AF, I don't use any Sony 

lenses on it. Using old Nikkors the aperture control is

is by the ring on the lens where god himself intended 

it to be, so the camera's sole dial controls the shutter.   

     

My lenses are 50 yrs old and are great for MF. OTOH 

it's not my only camera, so the limitations are not any 

hardship. If I need a more high tech camera and lens 

I do have those on hand. The a3000 is a spare body. 

   

Due to its lack of features, the user manual is shorter 

than the typical lengthy tomes, so you really ought to 

get fully familiar with it. 

Did not realize it was that much of a dinosaur camera bud ! To be fair it was brought for me as a Christmas pressie and on the read up on it , It's described as a budget camera but a very good one in that bracket !  Must admit I've still got a lot of exploring to do with it but in all , Very good!..

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Amazingly the Sony manual seems to skip how to use Manual

Mode!!  It should be on page 44 by my determination, but not

there in my perusal of the download.  So perhaps Username,

who has the camera, could just give you the steps needed to

control the shutter and the aperture in M mode?  ......... 

 

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/548338/Sony-Ilce-3000.html

       

Sony always posts 2 pdf manuals per model, the short 

and simple one, and the FULL one. Here's the links for 

BOTH of them. I haven't read them yet, cuz to me the 

a3000 is just self-evident in use ... but I know Sony's 

ways about posting manuals online, so below I posted 

both of the URLs. The book that fails to inform about

manual usage is the short "quick start" book, aka the

"PHD" version [Push here, Dummy.] 

 

docs.sony.com/release//ILCE3000_Handbook.pdf   
   
docs.sony.com/release//ILCE3000.pdf
   
   
Read page 59 of the HANDBOOK [longer book]. It's all 
quite plain right there and is really easy. Enjoy ! 
   
  
     
`    
`
  
`
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Guest Jaf-Photo

Yes that's the scenairo jaf-photo, You can not adjust or set each one separately ! one adjusts automatically with the other which just takes away that 100% way of manually setting it ;) .

Anyway, Hay Ho it is what it is I guess :rolleyes:

I thought that was what you were after. If It's not, I clearly see M(anual) on the settings dial, which will allow you to set aperture and shutter speed independently. Anyway, I'll leave yous too it as I'm not sure what's going on here.

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That's the answer, thanks to User, the control wheel

toggles between aperture and shutter selection.

    

I'd actually forgot that it does that ! I set the 

aperture directly on the AI Nikkor lenses and 

I work in "S" mode. so the front dial controls 

the shutter speed. There's no meter readout

that way, but I don't need that neither. I just 

check the histogram. Such a simple camera 

works perfectly for that approach :-)  

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Sony always posts 2 pdf manuals per model, the short 

and simple one, and the FULL one. Here's the links for 

BOTH of them. I haven't read them yet, cuz to me the 

a3000 is just self-evident in use ... but I know Sony's 

ways about posting manuals online, so below I posted 

both of the URLs. The book that fails to inform about

manual usage is the short "quick start" book, aka the

"PHD" version [Push here, Dummy.] 

 

docs.sony.com/release//ILCE3000_Handbook.pdf   
   
docs.sony.com/release//ILCE3000.pdf
   
   
Read page 59 of the HANDBOOK [longer book]. It's all 
quite plain right there and is really easy. Enjoy ! 
   
  
     
`    
`
  
`

 

Brilliant, Perfect answer ,,And many thanks for you help:-)

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