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Hello,

Hope you are doing well.

Ive read a lot of conflicting renditions on the sensor cleaning procedure for an a7riv.

If you choose to clean your sensor with a sensor cleaning kit I understand the way to do it is to try the cleaning mode first. If that does not eliminate the problem then on to a manual method such as wet/dry cleaning.

My question is.....

After you try the camera cleaning mode and you are ready to clean the sensor manually, do you leave the camera on during the cleaning process or do you turn the camera off before the manual cleaning process?

Ive read numerous articles and the instructions say either to turn camera off, leave it on or they dont specifically say either way.

No clue on how to proceed and not able to get on Sony chat help after waiting about a half an hour.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks so much,

Rick 

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Rick,

If you have a manual it should have clear instructions.  Mine does, but it is not an a7riv, so my procedure is probably different.  If you don't have a manual, there is probably one at the Sony website.  I would trust that over others' opinions.

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7 hours ago, XKAES said:

Rick,

If you have a manual it should have clear instructions.  Mine does, but it is not an a7riv, so my procedure is probably different.  If you don't have a manual, there is probably one at the Sony website.  I would trust that over others' opinions.

thanks so much will take a look! 

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