Jump to content

Best colour inkjet printer (A3)


Recommended Posts

I'm thinking of getting a good colour printer to do up to A3 size without costing a fortune of money and hassle in cartridges. The Epson eco-tank et-7750 looks good, but I'm struggling to find serious reviews. Does anyone own this printer? Could you share your pros and cons? Many thanks in advance

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

At the risk of sounding flippant, if you're serious about producing good quality prints on good quality paper you will have to spend serious money. Such printers offer 8 to 10 large capacity ink cartridges with the ability to handle a variety of paper sizes and thicknesses such as Epson Sure Color P600 or P800, Canon Pixma Pro 100s, etc.

Buying a consumer grade printer will save money but limits output quality and use of better (think thicker) fine art papers.

I use an Epson P800 and am very happy with the quality of the prints and is now available at well below its $1,200 cost due to the release of newer models. Good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 5 weeks later...

Many thanks Cass and Bokeh, and sorry for the late reply. I ended up buying the Epson et-7750 and so far it has proved to be exceptionally good - for me the perfect compromise between a very high quality machine with expensive inks which I would love, but would be better than my photos, and an amazing printer for volume output, where I can print day to day documents and as many 6 x 4s as I like, while printing nice A4s and A3s in outstanding quality when I feel it's worth it. With two sets of refillable inks, I would imagine I'll never need to buy any more, as it's likely to last me several years. I've invested in some really good Marrutt paper and I can't imagine getting better prints. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

I use the Epson SP 970.

Printing on A3 uses a lot of ink (particularly light cyan) 

However, printing at best quality on Satin Archival paper gives me lovely prints which should last ages without fading.

Archival paper is acid free and said to last 150years! without fading (don't ask me how they came up with this figure)

I also spray the print withUV protection and mount using archival techniques (look on line for instruction) Surprisingly easy.

I keep my mounted prints in a portfolio unitl I want to frame them (switching what pics I have on the wall when I want a change)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Posts

    • Hi Pieter, Not yet. I've thought about that, to use a tripod. But I've no time to try that yet. I'll try it this weekend and let you know.  Thanks!
    • Did you try manually focussing at 135mm, camera on tripod / solid ground, delayed release? If you can get sharp pictures that way, at least you know the optics are fine.
    • I don't know how those cameras would fare as aviation cameras - either of them are far beyond my scope of purchase - but people have been taking pictures of planes and other man-made flying objects well, as long as they have been around.  Unless the aircraft is flying straight at you or flying perpendicularly away from you, the AF lagging behind the shutter should not be an issue and in almost all cases you would be shooting at infinity so internal lens movements to acquire focus should be at a minimum.  If you are expecting to crop a lot, I guess a camera with higher resolution would be better for you but that also depends on what you are going to do with the image.  If you are going to be printing large mural sized prints, higher resolution image would be better but if you are going to print at or below 11x17 or not print at all, even a cropped image from my A7II will be good enough on any consumer grade monitors on the market.  I have seen images printed from the first generation Olympus OM-D E-M5 (16MP) at 11x17 and they were excellent.
  • Topics

×
×
  • Create New...