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cmycycle

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  1. Have you looked at DXOmark ? They have a pretty detailed review of the APS-C sensor. https://www.dxomark.com/sony-a6400-sensor-review/
  2. For lenses, since you have the 16-50 kit lens, stick with that for a while and see which focal lengths you tend to prefer. For landscapes and pet portraits you can use any focal length on the kit lens for those shots, just depends on what kind of look you want. Just keep in mind the 1.5 crop factor for APS-C sensors. As an example, a 50mm lens on an APS-C sensor gives you a 75mm field-of-view (50mm x 1.5).
  3. Sounds like you and your girlfriend are pretty frustrated with the results from your A6100. Keep this in mind: Progress, not Perfection. No photographer claims their picture is perfect, and pretty much every photography I've listened to as talk about the "journey" of photography. Down to the nitty-gritty of getting that noise out of your photo: ISO in film land is about how sensitive to light the film material is. Now throw that concept out, because it doesn't apply to digital photography. The sensitivity of the image sensor in your camera never changes. ISO in digital land is how much digital gain you add to your picture to compensate for low exposure/low light. High Gain (High ISO) = High Noise. The ISO setting on your A6100 (or any digital camera for that matter) that has the least gain is ISO 100. Setting your camera to ISO 100 is really easy: On the D-pad on the back of your camera, press the side that says "ISO" to bring up the ISO settings menu. It's by default set to AUTO. On this menu you can set the range for ISO or manually select the ISO yourself. Now this is where the "Exposure Triangle" I suggested you Google comes up: With a lower ISO of 100, you'll have to let more light into your camera to properly exposure your picture. You do this by slowing your shutter speed and opening your aperture (F-stop). But nothing comes from free: low shutter speed means that your image could be blurry if you subject moves or your hands shake. Wide aperture will get you background blur (bokeh), which you may want if you want to isolate your subject, but you're not going to want if you want everything in your picture to be in focus. Most of the time I keep my A6400 on Aperture Priority ("A" on the top dial). That means that the camera selects the appropriate shutter speed and ISO for the aperture I selected. You should also set the lower limit of your shutter speed (on the menu it's "ISO AUTO Min. SS"). Start with a lower value, like 1/100 sec. From there, like I said before, experiment, figure out what works. You'll find out that there are situations where you have to bump up your ISO because of lighting conditions.
  4. For APS-C sensors, noise starts to get noticeable when you're at ISO 1000 or above. Though if you're viewing the image on a 14" laptop or a cellphone, you usually don't notice the noise unless you zoom in 100%. To lower your ISO value and maintain proper exposure, you'll have to drop your shutter speed and open your aperture to compensate. Just Google "exposure triangle" and experiment. Also, don't sweat it if your picture has some noise in it due to your ISO setting. It's not the end of the world, and if you're happy with what you captured in your picture, then that's what matters.
  5. 1. Yes. C1 setting is under Camera 2->Custom Operation1 (8/9)->Custom Key->Top. Zoom option is under menu #17. 2. Yes (I'm assuming by "water-gauge" you mean the level indicator). EVF display settings are under Camera 2->Display/Auto Review1 (6/9)->Finder. There will be a check box list, check Level. When the EVF is active press the Disp button on the back wheel to cycle through the display settings. 3. No. Too bad Sony doesn't make the menu system update-able via Firmware.
  6. Good time to jump into the wonderful world of mirrorless cameras! But I would say your question on which "affordable" Sony mirrorless camera to buy next is really broad. If you ask that from 10 different camera owners, you're going to get 10 different answers. Which ever body you end up with, all the Sony mirrorless cameras use the E-mount system. So make sure you budget for an A-to-E mount adapter if you want to re-use your A-mount lenses.
  7. Since you're taking shots of still products, so you might want to consider a cheap manual focus lens instead of pulling out money for something with auto-focus. Did you get the A6000 with the 16-50mm kit lens? If you did, you could just stick with that and not spend anymore cash. Since these are product photos, you can drop your shutter speed to compensate for the f/3.5 at 16mm. Also, I'm assuming these photos are going onto a website and aren't going to be blown-up to full size, so you could also shoot at a higher ISO to compensate for lighting.
  8. The 50mm on an APS-C sensor is going to give you an equivalent of a 75mm lens (focal length x 1.5 crop factor). The iPhone XS wide-angle lenses give you an equivalent of around 26mm focal length (you should be able to find what the equivalent focal length of the camera on the iPhone you have). That makes a big difference in your field of view, as you're experiencing. If you're used to something wide on the iPhone like ~26mm equivalent focal length, then you'll probably want to get something like a 16mm lens (24mm equivalent) for your A6000.
  9. Yes, optically the SELP1650 is a decent lens, probably gets more crap that it deserves. When I was using in on my trip last year, I liked how it pancakes down. Very easy to pack and carry around. I love my two prime lenses, but compared to the kit lens they're a bit bulky, especially the Sigma 56mm.
  10. Had to go on an treasure hunt to find my SELP1650! I haven't mounted it since buying my 35mm and 56mm primes. Yeah, I noticed that when I zoom with the zoom ring, there's noticeable rattling. Less rattling when using the PZ for zooming. I also did a quick search and found similar complaints on DPReview. So it's not just you. The SELP1650 is a decent starting lens, but Sony doesn't put maximum effort into it. https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3728156
  11. I went out this weekend to take photos of cyclists along a local road that I know they frequent with my A6400 and the Sigma 56mm F1.4. The 56mm on the A6400 grabbed focus quickly and accurately. Looking through the shots I took, the only time it looked like the focus wasn't always 100% was during high interval shooting of a group of cyclists as they passed through. So when my original subject was moving out of the frame and the camera was searching for a new subject, it was out of shot for 1 frame, but found a new subject the next shot. Not a very scientific test, but I really enjoyed taking the Sigma 56mm out on a photo walk.
  12. I just bought the Sigma 56mm f1.4. I haven't taken it out for a real-world spin yet. I don't have the Sony 50mm f1.8 OSS to compare, but I do have the 35mm f1.8 OSS for my A6400. Just testing the AF speed around my room in normal light on still objects, the Sigma 56mm seems slower to focus compared to my SEL35F18. There's a few times it had to search a bit for focus, whereas the SEL35F18 is super quick on the AF speed.
  13. Hi, I'm CMY and I'm a GAS-aholic. All joking aside, Tadwil is right about not jumping right into buying your first AF Prime Lens. The 35mm F1.8 OSS that Pieter mentioned is an EXCELLENT prime lens, and it was the first lens I bought after using the 16-50mm kit lens. But it's going for $470 on B&H at the moment, so it'll put a significant dent in your wallet. As others have mentioned, the 16-50mm wasn't designed to have a lens hood. My advice is to not sweat about the lens hood. Spend more time getting to know your new A6400 and what real-world situations you face the 16-50mm can and can't handle. There's a lot of analysis on Youtube and forums about cases that you may rarely face. For my 16-50mm, I loved all the pictures I took with it in Japan. When I look at vacation photos, I'm not pixel peeping at the corners for sharpness. In fact, the only thing I don't like about my photos was completely my fault: when I set the dial to Aperture priority, I didn't have the Auto ISO Min Shutter Speed set correctly. So my A6400 defaulted to a shutter speed of 1/4000th, and I had some cloudy outdoor pictures where the ISO was bumped up to 2000! Completely my fault for not knowing my camera, and not because of the lens or lack of a lens hood.
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