Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/24/2022 in all areas

  1. Exactly! That is the perfect way of summarizing it.
    1 point
  2. That guy is kinda correct, but I agree with Pieter -- the way he is presenting it can be confusing. As Pieter suggests you need to think APS format when thinking lenses -- not FULL-FRAME format. The exact same thing applies to 35mm full-frame cameras and half frame cameras. A 50mm lens is consider a normal lens for a full-frame digital or film camera. If you put the same lens on an APS or half-frame camera it is still a 50mm lens, but the sensor only sees the central section -- so what you get is a cropped image, or longer focal length effect. You would get the same effect if you used a 75mm lens on a full frame camera. So if you want the same normal lens effect of a full-frame 50mm lens on an APS or half-frame camera, you need to use a shorter focal length lens -- such as 30mm. It's easier if you think APS format when thinking of focal lengths, and not FULL-FRAME format -- although people who use both APS and full-frame cameras get used to it. It sort of like speaking French and Spanish -- similar in some ways, but not the same.
    1 point
  3. The guy you spoke to was wrong and is spreading the confusion. It's not like the fullframe equivalent focal length is the 'true' focal length of a lens. Your 56mm is as true a 56mm lens as if it were designed for fullframe, medium format or micro 4/3. Crop factor is only relevant when comparing one system to another. If all you've ever used is an APS-C system and know what a 56mm lens looks like on your camera, why would you want to relate to a fullframe system? Somehow mankind decided fullframe is the general standard to relate to when talking about equivalent focal length. Could have been any other format.
    1 point
  4. Crop factor is a property of your camera(sensor), not of the lens. Focal length is a property of the lens and has nothing to do with the camera. The only difference between a lens designed for APS-C and a lens designed for fullframe is that a fullframe lens can cover a larger image circle if used on a bigger sensor. On your A6400, a 56mm lens will always look the same, be it designed for APS-C or fullframe.
    1 point
  5. Yep... you're right Pieter, my memory of every discussion is not good...Sorry.
    1 point
  6. I went to Iceland for one month. Shot on the Sony A7III & Mavic air 2. What do you guys think?😁 https://youtu.be/Dka7eySgGiE
    1 point
  7. Alex Shiu

    Downtown Seattle

    #sonyalphagallery
    1 point
  8. In your video, you are making a lot of small movements like leaning forward to grab your phone, leaning back a little to read the question, putting the phone back down then you settle yourself back to the original position to reply to the question. Rinse and repeat for every question. Each time you move forward or backward, the camera automatically tries to keep your face in focus and it seems to do that very well. The problem is, the camera and the background are stationary but you are not and so the distance between yourself and the camera and the distance between yourself and the background changes every time you move and these changes are showing up with the background seemingly going in and out of focus. If the background was non-descriptive with no distinct feature this wouldn't pose much of a problem but in your case, those lights changing focus every time you move is very distracting. Since you only move very little back and forth, it might be a good idea to use manual focus and take advantage of the depth of field to keep yourself in acceptable focus as you move back and forth. Download the DOF Calculator for your Android phone or something equivalent for iPhone to calculate the depth of field. For example, if you are 4ft away from the camera with the lens set at f8.0, 24mm focal length, 11.96in in front of you and 23.86in behind you will be in acceptable focus. As long as you are within that 35in space you will be in acceptable focus. You can play with the aperture and the focal length so you can work within the space of your place then set the camera and lens to the values you have selected and give it a go. In the landscape video, you are most likely shooting at or near infinity. Again, manually focus on the nearest subject of interest (most likely the cascading waterfall) and let the depth of field take care of the background which is probably at infinity focus will be in focus anyway.
    1 point
  9. I absolutely love photography and the Sony cameras and lenses. I'm semi-retired now and spend as much time as possible photographing wildlife. I currently have an A9, A7RIV, and A6600 and many Sony lenses. I'm thinking of upgrading to the A9ii or A1. The only thing I don't like about the A9 is that sometimes my thumb hits the exposure compensation dial and I get a severely underexposed photo. The A9ii has a lock on it so that won't happen. I keep thinking I will check it before shooting. But, I hike in the woods and constantly pull the camera with the 100-400 lens in and out of the holster case. Often very quickly and don't check the exposure compensation dial. Consequently the A9ii will be better. But, do I go all the way to an A1? This is a hobby and I'm not rich. I could sell my A6600 and lenses and A7RIV and A9 and come close to the cost of the A1. I'm a perfectionist and often go too far. I have sever bird prints 12 x 18 that were made with the A6600 APS-C camera. You can see all the details of the feathers in the printed photo. Why do I want more than that? What are you thoughts? Be kind... John
    1 point
  10. Asking for advise anywhere -- especially on the WEB -- can be tricky. The first obstacle is getting your request crystal clear to strangers. And when it comes to GEAR, it can be especially dicey. Everyone has their own approach. Mine is always use what you have -- it's a LOT cheaper and probably just as good. Soooo, much of what I say/advise is immediately dismissed. That's OK with me. Water off a duck's back. So it goes both way -- asking for advise or giving advise. Be prepared for the unexpected responses. "Take what you like, and leave the rest".
    1 point
  11. Rumor has it that the A9iii this year is only a rumor. Who knows? It may sound crazy, but the A9 was my favorite camera. I liked it better than the A7RIV. When I went out into the field, I would check the exposure compensation dial. But, somehow my thumb would still get in the way and spin the dial. I would come home after a full day of hiking with severely underexposures photos. Taking photos of flying birds is often a feat of acrobatics. To me, the lock on the exposure compensation dial is enough of a reason to upgrade. The other upgraded features of the A9ii are not important to me. John
    1 point
  12. You are not asking for advice, you are asking for affirmation of the choice you have made. You say the images made with A6600 are already more than good enough for your needs but you are trying sell it too, along with the two full frame cameras that have been sold. Once A6600 leaves your hands, you will be without a camera for which I am sure you have a replacement in mind or already have been procured. Here is my advice whether it too late or not... Hang on to your A6600 for now and hold off on acquiring an A9II. According to the rumours, A9III is slated for release in late 4th quarter of this year. If the A9III is as great an upgrade as A9II was over the A9, sure enough your GAS will start kicking you in the butt to get the A9III. If the A9III turns out to be an incremental upgrade over the A9II, you can still get an A9II then and probably at a discounted price as well.
    1 point
  13. If you've been following this forum for as long as I have, it's not hard to diagnose DrJohns well-developed case of GAS.
    1 point
  14. If you head over to Pentax Forums and look at the BIF photos, they are consistently great as well. Vast majority of the images were taken with Pentax cameras which the pundits in reviews websites have been harping on about the mediocrity their Auto Focus system as compared to other major brands, well basically forever. If a camera brand whose AF is allegedly as inferior as Pentax is, can still deliver stunning birds in flight photographs, then it's clear that it's the techniques of the photographers and not the technology in the cameras that determines the result. Truthfully, I am flabbergasted at the OP's reason for wanting to upgrade his already state of the art cameras to the latest bleeding edge cameras. Pulling the camera out of his holster sometimes changes the setting of the exposure compensation dial. I mean, it's only one lousy dial! The OP only needs to glance at the top of the camera each time he pulls the camera out of the holster and check the exposure compensation dial to see if the dial has been knocked out of position or not, and correct it if it has. It will take less than 5 seconds to fix and it should be a part of every photographer's routine to check the camera is in good working order before commencing with his or her shoot. Sorry OP if I seem unkind but I think your reason for upgrading is just that - because you can.
    1 point
  15. I got curious about the warranty period for Sony cameras (not applicable to me since I do not buy any brand new cameras) while browsing through this thread. I checked both Sony Canada and Sony USA and except for the Sony A1 which has a three year warranty all other cameras (all A9 series and all A7series) are warrantied for one year. Maybe the OP bought an extended warranty from the authorized Sony camera dealer?
    1 point
  16. Your shutter fix pretty much mirrors my experience* as far as pricing goes though I'd insist they replace the part. Had a shutter leaf bind up preventing it from opening all the way. Manually reset it myself but after it happened a second time there was no way I'd trust the thing to not get caught again with those microscopic tolerances and all. It's false economy to keep it after how many activations? A new shutter gets you back to zero again. *...Used Precision Camera twice. Once for a stuck shutter assembly (Think of horizontal blinds in the lowered position and having the cat jump at the birds at the feeder just outside the window) in 2018 for $260...
    1 point
  17. I keep hearing people complain that it costs $500 + to even look at mending a Sony camera. - This must be an American thing. In UK I'm getting a new shutter system, and service for £200 - If they find they can fix the shutter without replacing it they knock the cost of the parts off (£90).
    1 point
  18. Just a thought. Why not contact an authorized Sony repair facility and show them a copy of the five year warranty? And start a new thread on "How long is YOUR Sony warranty?"
    1 point
  19. Hope you remember to come back after things get sorted out to let us know what the problem was and the cost. It may help some other misfortunate sort in a similar situation in the future.
    1 point
  20. Unfortunately, it still remains as the same problem. I did find my warranty for the camera, and on paper it actually says that it's good for 5 years. However, Sony's customer support keeps insisting that warranties for the A7RIII are only good one year and they refuse to double check the warranty ID to double check on it.
    1 point
  21. I'm not in the "trashing you for using the camera", but before you send it off, you ought to take the time to see if we can figure it out. How about answering my earlier question: So the camera has the exact same problem when powered by the AC cord -- without a battery installed?
    1 point
  22. Thank you for you input VTC & XKAES, I spoke with a local camera shop about repairing the camera, and they mentioned that there is, in fact, another facility that repairs Sony Cameras called "Chris Camera Services" nearby in Phoenix Arizona, (if anyone else is interested in alternative options besides Precision Camera). Sony does not have it listed as the closest repair shop, though the people at Chris Camera Services are certified by Sony. This shop has far more positive reviews, and I'll be sending it off there for repair tomorrow. On a side note, I'm not here to argue with you guys about the wisdom behind using my A7RIII as a camera for recording professional tutorials and consultations. My clients buy my products & services for both its quality and professionalism. Having a A7RIII certainly does add a fair degree of "quality" and "professionalism" to what my company offers, and this camera ought to be perfectly capable of doing so without dying out in less than two years because I plugged in a usb cable. Besides, as I've mentioned previously, I also gain dual-use out of it through side-gig wedding photography and landscape shooting. Being that I have consultations & deadlines due by next week, I will need to buy another camera between now and whenever this repair may be completed. So, unless someone at Sony can tell me about some magical way to fix to this problem, I imagine that I will be gradually switching over to either Cannon or Nikon because of this experience. I need to be able to troubleshoot my own equipment and achieve fast turn-around times if something goes wrong, and that does not seem to be possible at the moment with Sony DSLR cameras. If anyone else has a solution for, or can identify - what two slowly flashing red lights followed by three fast ones means, then I would truly appreciate the help. If I can get an idea of what this error message means, then I can probably get a more accurate estimate from the repair shop of when I may be able to get my camera operational again. Thank you, - Tyler
    1 point
  23. Used Precision Camera twice. Once for a stuck shutter assembly (Think of horizontal blinds in the lowered position and having the cat jump at the birds at the feeder just outside the window) in 2018 for $260 something and the last time for a menu system that kept rotating through menu items, image review, and time zone selections randomly on its own (2020). No complaints to speak of. Likely a misunderstanding of 500 skins just to look at it. You may be able to shop the thing around for estimates ($90 is a typical 'look-at' fee around here to evaluate it} but how many of those you willing to pay for before you decide to get it fixed at a price you seem is reasonable? As someone who makes money with it $522 was doable to get mine back in 10 days time. (Hit their doorstep Aug 14 & out of repair Aug 17!) Didn't want to waste three weeks ferreting out someone who might do it for $325 after waiting for the parts to arrive. I'm certain PC is in the priority pipeline for original Sony parts since Sony itself recommends them.
    1 point
  24. So the camera has the exact same problem when powered by the AC cord -- without a battery installed?
    1 point
  25. I've been rotating between two Sony batteries plus the incoming power from the USB-C chord. In order for this to be a battery issue, both batteries would have to had died at the same time, so I imagine that scenario is unlikely. When charging batteries, I use an AC adapter. It would seem that I would get better service from Nikon or Canon based on conversations I've had with repair shops that are closer to Colorado, the only third-party repair shop suggested by Sony is Precision Camera - which across the country with very low google review ratings, and according to what I see online, Sony continually ranks the worst compared to the other companies when it comes to camera repair. When I bought my A7RIII, I just assumed that it was made well and wouldn't just die from usage after a year and 1/2, so I didn't look into the repair process at the time. Does anyone know of another company besides Precision Camera that fixes Sony cameras? I've read absolute horror stories about Precision Camera, and I really want more options than that when it comes to repairing my camera.
    1 point
  26. Since it's ON for 8-10 hours per day, I would assume you use an AC adapter, but you have only used batteries, correct? My first thought is that the batteries are simply worn out. They can only be recharged so many times. Do you have an AC adapter? Have you tried a NEW battery? Do you somehow know that you will get better service from Nikon or Canon?
    1 point
  27. So, to answer various questions about the situation, here are some more details: 1. I use this as a webcam and for the occasional landscape/wedding photography shoot. The reason why I went with such an expensive option is because I sell online tutorials and technical consultations for work. In my opinion, the video quality from the A7RIII makes my business look great, and I get a double-usage out of it as a hobby/side work camera. 2. I turn the camera off at the end of the day, but it still gets a lot of miles in with at least 8-10 hours a day of work. 3. Nothing has changed in terms of environmental factors. The camera has been mostly sitting on a tripod, and the last time I took it out was a few months back for a wedding shoot. So, overall, it's not exposed to environmental problems. 4. The lens, and settings have not changed for months due to the fact that it just stands on the tripod and records video. When it died, it was just standing there like usual with no immediate changes being made. 5. The red light is towards the back of the camera next to the memory card slots 6. Unfortunately, the camera is out of warranty because it's been used for a year and 1/2, and sending it in for a $550 evaluation will only be the beginnings of what it may take to repair whatever has gone wrong. Apparently, Sony doesn't really service cameras in the United States. The closest place for an evaluation is all way across the country in Connecticut through a very low-rated third party vendor. 7. Sony does not provide an explanation as to what these error codes mean. I've checked the user documentation, searched online, etc... and it seems to be private knowledge for Sony techs... who don't really service in the United States... who want to charge me $550 to tell me what the blinking red light means... So, unless Sony can get back to me on what's going on here, I'm selling all my Sony stuff and going with Nikon or Cannon. Paying $550 just for someone to say, "yep, it's broken" or "yep, you'll need to pay another $500 to get it fixed" isn't worth the price of just getting a new camera... with a new warranty... with a company that services their equipment in the United States. But hey, I'm open to troubleshooting this if it's possible because I hate to see my investment die after such a short period of time. Thank you for the replies, - Tyler
    1 point
  28. If your only complaint with the a9 is the dial moving unexpectedly a small tab of plastic electrical tape between the dial and the frame can prevent it from moving and is easily removed and reapplied when needed. This is what I do on my rx100iii. Could save you a lot of money.
    1 point
  29. We'll need more information in order to help. Has this camera been ON for an entire year 24/7? Has anything changed lately? Moved? Dropped? Different lens? Settings Changed? I could go on. Right now, we have nothing to work with.
    1 point
  30. Are you sure you haven't inadvertently changed any settings on your camera? The LCD may not be showing, if the eye detection sensor is near an object, or even if a bit of dirt has got on it. If the red lights flashing are on the front of the camera, maybe the shooting mode has got changed to self timer? If you've only had it for a year, it should be under warranty. Even if it isn't - it is a lot cheaper to send it in for repair, than buying a new one. I'm rather surprised that you are using a camera as good as an A7Riii just as a webcam. With the limited resolution on computers, I'd be using a cheapo camera. Good luck with getting it fixed.
    1 point
  31. I own A9 and A1, and owned A7Riv. It depends on what your subject is. For wildlife, and using 100-400, 200-600 or others like them, the A1 has basically only one advantage - the 50MP for me. I also hike a lot, but keep the camera/lens combo on a leash, with the hood on for protection. This way, I can minimize my movements and slow down when discovering a subject, so there is better chance to get the shots (on e-shutter, and silenced). As for the movie capabilities, there is a documented problem with focusing, that is not there with the A9, which is, the camera ignores the focus button when shooting a clip. The focus is not more "sticky" than my A9, and is lost even when shooting continuously - for instance a flying bird that comes in from a sky background (start shooting - locked-on), and then comes in over a mountain shoulder and veers left/right and you lose the focus almost immediately (it happened to me using the 200-600, and using the recently bought 400mm prime). Overall, I have grown quit disappointed with the A1, and nowadays would probably go for the A9ii, just to keep the costs low, and also, it already has the two UHS-II cards, which is also an improvement over the A9, which I use mostly for photographing wildflower and butterflies (using 70-200 lens). I reccommend using a side grip (2 battery slide) for both to prevent running out of battery mid-day. Murphy's law states that this will happen in the least opportune moment - and it does. I hope this helps.
    1 point
  32. I have the A9II, the A7R4 and the A7M4 and I also do Wildlife. All these 3 bodies can do different things for you in wildlife. A lot is depending on the glass you are using and the wildlife you are trying to catch. For example A7R4 can give you stunning results, but most probably not with a 200-600. Attached to the 400GM its a dream combo... Indeed there is the universal answer to all your needs - its clearly the A1, because it combines all of the strengths in one single body. And it seems to work flawlessly with all the glass for wildlife. So this is the simple, but most expensive solution. If you want a small upgrade, I would recommend to test the A7M4. Although its limited in fps, the AF system is very close to the one of the A1. You need to use the mechanical shutter, because of rolling shutter for BIF, but this is not a real issue. Buying the A9II is somewhere in between but in terms of usage (rolling shutter, AF, drive speed etc.) its much closer to the A1 than the A7M4. Except that you that you are more limited in terms of cropping. But if you are satisfied with 12x18 prints from a A6600, then there is no reason to join the megapixel race with the A1. So up to you to chose.
    1 point
  33. I understand that you like birding and you are frequently taking your camera kit in and out of your holster, accidentally turning the exposure compensation dial to your chagrin. If you are going to be shooting at a moment's notice a lot, why would you be carrying the camera in a bag/holster at all? Get yourself a camera harness like the Cotton Carrier which can keep the camera hanging in front of your chest and ready to shoot. I also like the fact that it has a secondary safety strap that can be attached to the camera to keep the camera from falling to the ground if you somehow not insert the camera into the Cotton Carrier properly. Something the Peak Design Clips lack.
    1 point
  34. I'm inclined to agree with XKAES. Why go for a lower resolution camera, when you've got the A7Riv? Do you feel you need 30 fps rather than 10? I've seen some of your photos - they are excellent already. If I had money to spend - I'd be looking at the new 75-200 GM lens - the fast 2.8 aperture could be useful in those dark woods (but then I'm not as experienced wildlife photographer as you) Oh... I've just seen your last post about the benefits of the A9. Rumour has it that Sony are releasing the A7Rv and A9iii this year.
    1 point
  35. I would think that the A7RIV would be all perfectionist would want. None of the other cameras comes close to its pixel level. Getting an A9II or A1 would be a step down in that regard -- although they might have features that are more important for you. Do you have a problem with your A7RIV? If not, maybe sell the A9 and A6600 (or keep one as a backup), and buy some better glass for your A7RIV.
    1 point
  36. Sony 7RM4 + FE 24-105 1/60 sec f/8 ISO 100
    1 point
  37. Shot on Sony A77v + Sigma 24-105 f4 Art
    1 point
  38. Sydney Opera House at dusk, shot with Sony A7R IV + Leica 50mm APO Summicron-M lens (Novoflex adapter). December, 2019. #sonyalphagallery
    1 point
  39. 1 point
×
×
  • Create New...