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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/14/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Iansky

    Colours

    Out again today to take more photos with the 70-300 and I am very happy with the colours and the results.
  2. 2 points
    EddN

    Squirrel - Canon FD 85mm L

    Shortly after getting the Canon FD 85mm f/1.2 L lens to use on the Sony A7 (Fotodiox adapter I think) I decided to take it to the park to see what wildlife I could get. I found some very cooperative squirrels. Unfortunately they were so friendly that they were often too close for the lens to focus (90cm minimum focus distance). This is an un-cropped image.
  3. 2 points
    Alejandro Espeche

    Juliet

  4. 2 points
    Lescatalpas

    Which fast lens?

    The 55 1.8 zeiss is amazing, I would consider that lens for sure, certainly for indoors. And in stead of prime I would consider the 16-35. If you have money to burn the f/2.8 and otherwise the f/4. Both are amazing. The new 24 is still an unknown, but it's going to be g master, so I would bet that's a candidate.
  5. 1 point
    Phillip Reeve

    Helios-44-2 2/58

    I used my newly aquired Helios 2/58 for the first time today. Rendering ist quite different from my Minoltas and the sharp area of the image is much smaller but I think it is an interesting lens
  6. 1 point
    Don't you just love Ken Rockwell and his growing family! He knows practically everything and his Mercedes is fabulous. If you want to be sure to have pictures of the outings you make, get the zoom. The 55mm is a nice all-purpose lens unless you are inside and there is nowhere to back up to get the distance to fit everything in. You need something wider. Then you want to grab a portrait and the wide lens distorts the face...so much better to zoom in. Yes. The medium zoom is the way to go. With the ISO range of the Sony sensor, the f/4 aperture is not a problem. I have fast primes (Canon), they are nice in low light. If I did not have the 24-70mm zoom, I'd go with the 35mm f/1.4. I have 'always¨shot with a 35mm...well, since 1976 at least. As I have the zoom, that's my go-to lens.
  7. 1 point
    I have both the 70-200mm G Master and the 100-400 G Master, and the 2x teleconverter, and I've shot both lenses with the 2x teleconverter in the Amazon two times and in the Galapagos once. You indicated that you want to get into wildlife photography. Then, you should get the 100-400 G Master (or the 400mm f/2.8 GM if you can afford it). The 70-200 is too short for wildlife photography. Plus, the trade offs when using a 70-200 with a 2x teleconverter aren't worth it. In general, your wildlife subjects won't be standing still; they'll be moving, and oftentimes, you'll be dealing with low light scenarios. All of which means, a higher likelihood of auto focus issues and a higher likelihood of noisier, grainier shots with a 2x teleconverter. You should check out the reviews on the 100-400 G Master. It's an incredibly sharp lens.
  8. 1 point
    Thanks "Newbie" (sorry for not knowing your name), for this clarification. I'm afraid, in this case we'll have to dig a little deeper. I've annotated a diagram for this purpose. It's called a "Carrier diagram" or "Psychrometric chart". For an explanation of scientific terms used, please refer to the respective article on wikipedia. Source/Author: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PsychrometricChart.SeaLevel.SI.svg This diagram tells you about various states of "moist air", containing more or less water in gaseous form. Along vertical lines the temperature remains constant. Horizontal lines are lines of constant water content, in grams of water per gram of dry air. The curved lines are lines of constant relative humidity. I have marked the two states you mentioned: Blue star for your dry cabinet, at 28° and 40% relative humidity. Red star for outside condition of 30° and 90% relative humidity. The large white area beyond the 100% relative humidity line (upper left) is where condensation occurs (the "foggy" area). Note, that at the "blue star" state you are a very comfortable ~15° safety margin away from the condensation line, whereas at the "red star" state you are a mere 2° away from condensation conditions. Again, assuming, that the lens is mounted to the body at all times, within the dry cabinet and outside, you have a volume of air sealed inside your camera which contains ~10grams of water per kg of dry air. Since this volume is sealed, so is the absolute amount of water trapped inside. That's why you are moving along a horizontal line, when heating your gear or cooling it off. All you change this way is the relative humidity inside the sealed volume. You would have to cool this off by 15° or more, to have condensation occur inside your camera on any internal surfaces. Considering your operating conditions, there is no way how this could happen. Also note, that your camera, after being taken out of the dry cabinet, is already 2° colder than outside conditions, which would completely eat up your safety margin from condensation start from the red star state. In that case, I would expect condensation to become visible on the outside of the front lens. Much like in winter, when people wearing glasses enter a heated room from the outside. My recommendation is, to heat up your dry cabinet as close as possible to outside temperatures, to avoid this second type of condensation. If that's not possible, then give your gear considerably more time than the stated 20 minutes, to accommodate to outside conditions, after taking it from the cabinet.
  9. 1 point
    Shot with A7rII & Sony 70-200 2.8
  10. 1 point
    Iansky

    Looking for a portrait lens

    I can endorse what LIveSots suggested, the Sony 85mm f1.8 prime is a stunning lens and great value for money - it delivers superb portraits.
  11. 1 point
    LiveShots

    Looking for a portrait lens

    I think the 85mm would be a great fit, but I would try using your 55mm 1.4, it’s sharp enough that you can crop it down a lot.
  12. 1 point
    I love the 18-135mm lens; the small footprint and useful range of focal lengths makes it the perfect travel zoom. With this lens on my A6000 the camera is small enough for a minimal pouch and ready to go for a wide variety of situations. The lens is a bit slow as you zoom in, but I'd rather have a smaller lens with quick manual zoom than a huge power zoom and f/4. I find the slowness of power zooms frustrating. Definitely 4/5 stars for me, and 5/5 stars considering the price.
  13. 1 point
    wildlightphoto

    Denali critters

    I spent the latter half of July and first half of August in the north, primarily Denali National Park Alaska. A few pictures (All: a7rII, FE 100-400 GM):
  14. 1 point
    You'll have to go a long way to beat the 55/1.8... You absolutely could pair it with the 24-105, but you might want to explore other primes as well (the 85/1.8 in particular)...
  15. 1 point
    siuma

    CHINESE GHOST FESTIVAL

    Lunar July is Chinese Ghost Festival... by A7R2 + Voigtlander 65F2 MARCO APO
  16. 1 point
    Bokehbobo

    Peak Design Anchor Recall

    I just had my V3 anchors replaced with the V4's and they came with circular spring clips (like a key chain ring) for cameras with small eyelets. Fortunately my a7rII has those nicely reinforced triangular eyelets that take the V4's with no problem. Absolutely necessary? Probably not, but with $5k+ worth of camera and lens swinging about... just saying.😉
  17. 1 point
    I have owned both lenses, and for me, it was a no contest with the 18-135 superior. I do not shoot video, so the power zoom feature was annoying. The 18-135 is the best general purpose, walk around zoom I have ever used from an image quality, size and weight aspect. It plus the Sigma 16mm 1.4 make up a superb, lightweight, flexible kit.
  18. 1 point
    Ciao Everybody! I'm new here, so first of all nice to met you people, (as well I'm quite new with Sony stuff so I would need your help) I'm Michele... writing from Italy. I would need your help to decide wich one between the above Lenses is the best value for my bucks.. I shoot mainly landscapes so I do not need a superduper fast lens but I would like something that gives back good quality images I know that these lenses have quite different prices but what I would like to understand is if it is worth to pay more or not... Also I was thinking about the canon that costs half the sony f/4 price and I know that has quite a good quality.. also considering the fact that the MC11 cames to a quite good price and works quite well.. I do not know guys.. let me know what do you think... thanks a lot to everyone that is willing to share his/her thoughts. have a great day
  19. 1 point
    finarphin

    Helios-44-2 2/58

    Here's another one.
  20. 1 point
    Stranger

    Lookup (Ferris wheel)

    Sony a77m2 + Sigma 1.4/35 Art
  21. 1 point
    Ceads45

    Try-out of the FE24-240mm OSS lens

    I see this tread is probably dead but I didn't see any other 24-240mm lens topics. I read a lot about lenses and see the charts and hear the comments. I do have to say that I Love my 24-240mm lens on my A7RII. I use it a lot. I used recently on a portrait shoot, yeah my 55 Zeiss was better but still man I have to say that the 24-240mm is a great lens for me. Yeah I might not be a professional yet but to have that kind of versatility in one lens is far out man.
  22. 1 point
    Pierre

    Try-out of the FE24-240mm OSS lens

    Exactly what's in my bag most of the time.
  23. 1 point
    temoore48

    Try-out of the FE24-240mm OSS lens

    I understand the OP's use of the 24-240. I have the lens for travel and sometimes use it for hiking where I need a range of focal lengths. I would also take the 16-35 and the 55. That makes for a reasonable travel combo. I also have 2 VC manual lenses, 15mm and 35mm 1.7, and a couple of Rokinon lenses, 85 and 135. All four of these have great image quality (in most cases). When I am out photographing on my own time (as opposed to traveling with wife and others, I more often use the primes and take my time). When with others who might be irritated with my more deliberate photography, I use the zoom(s) if there is a need to keep changing focal lengths. Nice to have choices. Often I will travel with most of the lenses, but restrict my carry bag to a few for the day or part of the day. Back to the original post, when I have used the 24 to 240, if I have taken good photos and done a good job with the post processing (raw) images, my friends and family usually comment on how great the photos look. Sure, the primes would have had a better image if enlarged, but most of the travel images are viewed on Smug mug, and even with the 24-240, they look good to most people.
  24. 1 point
    Songoo57

    Helios-44-2 2/58

    Helios 44-2 @ A7II Helios bought at ebay for 26 €
  25. 1 point
    miran

    Helios-44-2 2/58

    On of my favourite lenses, very distinctive bokeh (swirly). Can be very sharp stopped down but wide open only the very center is really sharp, the rest of the frame gets progressively more blury. Excellent for special effect portraits. NEX6_0001_9507 by Miran Amon, on Flickr NEX6_0001_9494 by Miran Amon, on Flickr NEX6_0002_2034 by Miran Amon, on Flickr
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