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Does adding protective glass or Polarized filter causes loss in Picture Quality?


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#21 Baiwei

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 08:49 PM

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I wanted to say that breaking a filter is MUCH cheaper then breaking a front element of a lens... But you already said that you will use filters. 

 

Kinds of filters:

 

MC/Non MC - MC stands for Multi Coated. This coating reduces glass ability to reflect light so a multi coated filter of any kind is always better then a non coated as it gives less internal reflections which sometimes can be noticed. Additionally, MC filters are always made from better optical glass. So look for MC sign on your every filter.

 

Protection filter - just a clear glass. It just protects your lens from braking, from scratches, from dust, rain, snow, etc.

 

UV Filter - made from special glass with special coating which cuts UV specter of the light. This is done to achieve more natural colors on the pictures taken. BUT in most conditions (if you are not going to shoot on Everest) UV filter is just another name of protection filter, nothing more. Every camera has UV filter on it's sensor so in normal conditions you will not notice ant difference between UV filter and a simple protection filter. As long as they both high quality of course!

 

CPL (Polarizing filter). Made from special tourmaline-like glass, which allows passing through only to the waves of light that are polarized in one particular dimension. In real life all reflected light from clear surfaces are highly polarized (reflections from water, from while clouds, from glass, from cars, etc). CPL filter can be rotated to cut polarized light off. This allows taking pictures with more pronounced white clouds, with water without too strong reflections on it, e.t.c. This is not a must have filter, you can buy one to experiment with it to understand how it works.

 

ND - Neutral density. Just a dark glass, neutral dark. Just reduces light getting into your camera. Useful for taking pictures of waterfalls with the effect of flowing water. Usually used with a tripod. ND2 cuts half of light from camera, ND4 cuts 3/4 of light, e.t.c

 

ND2-400 Variable. These filters are actually made from 2 CPLs. You can rotate one of them and the filter gets darker and darker. Costs much more then usual NDs

 

Manufacturers.

 

The best ones are B+W and Rodenstock as far as I know. They are creepy expensive though... There are less expensive manufacturers that produce filters of great quality, like Kenko, Hoya, and even some Chinese manufacturers found on Ebay.

 

I hope that helped :) 


A77-II, Tokina 11-16/2.8, Tamron 16-300/3.5-5.6, Tamron 60/2 Macro

A7-II, Tokina 17-35/4, Sigma 24-70/2.8, Sony LA-EA4, Viltrox EF-NEX III

And a bunch of manual lenses, some of them handmade by me. 


#22 Username

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 03:34 AM

 

Okay, I loved every one's feed back. Thanks all. And based on comments, I will

buy a filters. Now what should I buy? I have F55mm f1.8 Lens and I have 24-70

2.8 GM. Which should have UV filter and which have polarized. What kind

Circular or Linear and finally which brand is best?

 

I am sorry, this is the first DSLR I ever bought so I don't know much about lenses. 

  

OK. Sony does NOT sell any DSLRs. The current A-mount bodies are

SLTs and need circular polarizers. All other Sonys ILCs can use linear 

polarizers no problem. Actual DSLRs need circular polarizers so if you 

are also using any SLRs or SLTs you might as well standardize on only 

circular polarizers. I tend to use mainly Hoya, the HMC series but there 

are many other quality brands, and some brands have both a premium

and a "regular" line, at corresponding prices. 

  

Polarizers are expensive so consider any serious future plans to acquire 

additional lenses and if your intended new lenses use larger filters you'd 

do well to buy the larger size and use stepping rings on smaller lenses. 



#23 trcns

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 09:17 PM

Assuming that the best option for me is MC filter which prevents the reflection and protects the lens. I looked at Amazon and found two filters/Screen protectors. Both have the same price which one should I go with? Thinner is better or thicker. 

 

B+W 82mm XS-Pro Clear with Multi-Resistant Nano Coating Filter (007M) 

 

and

 

B+W 82mm Clear UV Haze with Multi-Resistant Coating (010M)



#24 Username

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 01:24 AM

I would get the UV, just cuz personally I prefer UV filters. 

Skylight filters are yukky pink, and I don't trust "clear" to 

be colorless, so at least with the UV I know where I'm at. 

  

It's really no matter anywho when shooting auto WB ... 

  

YMMV :-) 



#25 Baiwei

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 04:58 PM

Yep, take the UV one!


A77-II, Tokina 11-16/2.8, Tamron 16-300/3.5-5.6, Tamron 60/2 Macro

A7-II, Tokina 17-35/4, Sigma 24-70/2.8, Sony LA-EA4, Viltrox EF-NEX III

And a bunch of manual lenses, some of them handmade by me. 


#26 timde

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 07:03 PM

Sigma make a range of reportedly very strong Ceramic Protector filters. I have one on my Batis 25, after the original Zeiss UV filter shattered on an impact, and scratched the lens element ... I decided to try something a little more robust.

 

Otherwise, the Zeiss UV filters are OK and the T* coating is fairly good.



#27 Adrichardson

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 12:31 PM

It really depends on how you're using the lens. I use Hoya HD filters, which are great but do add a little bit of flare if you're looking for it.

Personally I don't use them at all unless I know the front element is at risk. Eg I'm off to Venice soon and will keep a filter on for the boat journey from/to the airport because of the risk of spray, but otherwise won't bother. Likewise if I'm somewhere sandy (eg Egypt) I'll keep it on. For a to day protection, the hood will protect against knocks.

#28 Jaf-Photo

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 12:30 PM

The 2470GM is the general purpose lens, so you should get good filters for that one.

A protector filter is better than a UV filter. The protector is stronger and you don't need any additional UV filtration. The sensor does that for you.

If you take photos outdoors in strong sunlight, you'll find a CIR-PL and ND filter useful.

As to which brand, just avoid the cheapest ones. They will ruin IQ for sure. I've been using Hoya Pro filters for years and I find them to have a good price/performance ratio.

Don't buy them on eBay, there are a lot of fakes going there.

#29 markphoto4u

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 07:34 AM

If you Google and examine some of the illustrations of color spaces that usually compare what the eye can see vs sRGB and adobeRGB you will notice that sensors are hard pressed to replicate green and blue. I agree that a polarizer can render a blue sky, for example, too blue sometimes. However, with practice one can achieve a nice sky while enhancing the clouds in a way that replicates what the eye can see. Also, I have noticed that using a polarizer to shoot landscapes with green foliage can bring your greens up to a level that looks nice. If you are shooting around water you get the added benefit of reducing unwanted reflections such that one can see through the water more like the human eye again. This allows a scenario where the water is more clear, and again comes closer to replicating what the eye can see.

An ND filter can be helpful in achieving slower shutter speeds for some pleasant effects that you might shoot for e.g. smoothing out moving water. A Big Stopper can allow long exposures in the neighborhood of two to five minutes.

These are just a few examples of how filters can be used to achieve results that can improve your landscapes.

A split ND can allow one to render a dark foreground and bright sky much better. Yes, one can use the split ND in post, but starting with a good exposure is preferable. Post can then be used to tweak your opinion of scene. You dodge the problem of decreasing your dark foreground areas by reducing shadows, and perhaps picking up some unwanted noise.


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#30 jayteepix

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:46 PM

IMO unless you require some effect, be that use of a polarising filter or ND filters, I tend to fastidiously rely on using the lens hood.

Folks who throw the lens hood in the closet are welcome to their opinions and they have made them abundantly clear, however I pay attention to my lens usage and rely on the hood not only for protection unless I require some specific filter effect.

The reason I adhere to no unnecessary extra glass is that having extensively explored a back focus problem with a Canon 1D3 and several lenses but particularly with a Canon 24-70 Mk1 using a high end Hoya Pro Digital filter where no amount of MFAdjust resolved my problem, by eventually removing the filter, the problem disappeared.

For me hoods do what they are designed to do vis-a-vis extraneous light but are my choice for lens protection too. Clearly others here differ. 

I didn't buy expensive glass for my Sony A7rII to potentially degrade my images by using any extra glass - to protect the lens??? - Believe me my Loxia 21mm is very precious to me and why would I even consider potentially compromising what it can achieve by sticking another piece of glass in front of it, being a large outlay, I take care of it as I do my Batis 85, SZ 55mm and my little but lovely FE 28mm??


Sony A7RII, Zeiss Loxia 21:f2.8 | Sony 28:f2 | Sony Zeiss Sonnar T* 55:f1.8 ZA |  Zeiss Batis 85:f1.8.  - Canon SX50HS - Canon SX260 HS

Website: www.jayteepics.com 


#31 Username

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 03:05 AM

If tests show problems with your filter, junk it 

and get a decent one. Lens hoods are often 

meaningless with modern lenses, especially 

cuz most users are zoom-addicted. But use 

a hood when it's needed. Test to find out. I'm 

downright amazed that my recently acquired 

high ratio zoom [10:1] is ridiculously resistant 

to flare, essentially immune to it. 10:1 zooms   

are not so petite and the hood added another 

50% to its overall length. I was verrrry happy 

to find the hood was 100% useless :-) I use a  

hoods on many of my legacy lenses, cuz the

benefit is clear. [Pun! chuckle here.]  



#32 Username

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 03:11 AM

If tests show problems with your filter, junk it 

and get a decent one. Lens hoods are often 

meaningless with modern lenses, especially 

cuz most users are zoom-addicted. But use 

a hood when it's needed. Test to find out. I'm 

downright amazed that my recently acquired 

high ratio zoom [10:1] is ridiculously resistant 

to flare, essentially immune to it. 10:1 zooms   

are not so petite and the hood added another 

50% to its overall length. I was verrrry happy 

to find the hood was 100% useless :-) I use a  

hoods on many of my legacy lenses, cuz the

benefit is clear. [Pun! chuckle here.]  




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